In the world of pharmacology, it often happens that a drug is popular not for its intended use, but for alternative methods of its use.

The same can be said about aromatase inhibitors, which, despite their prevalence in medicine, are known to many primarily as effective in bodybuilding and not only antiestrogenic agents.

 

What are aromatase inhibitors?

 

We will not rush right off the bat, but rather we will tell about everything in order, starting, as usual, with theory. So, aromatase inhibitors, also known as blockers or blockers, are a class of effective drugs used in medicine for the treatment of cancer, in particular breast cancer (not only).

In sports, for example, in bodybuilding, aromatase blockers are primarily useful when conducting a course of steroids, helping to reduce the concentration of estrogen, increase the level of endogenous testosterone and gonadotropic hormones. Athletes usually use them to prevent and/or eliminate estrogenic side effects such as gynecomastia (breast enlargement seen in men).

In more detail, in bodybuilding, aromatase inhibitor drugs are most often used during the course of anabolic steroids for the following purposes:

– prevention and disposal of estrogenic side effects (gynecomastia, etc.);
– an increase in the level of anabolic hormones in the blood (testosterone), etc.

It is important to note that aromatase inhibitors are classed as antiestrogen. As many people know, testosterone in our body can be converted (transformed) into estradiol. This happens with the assistance of an enzyme called aromatase. With the participation of the same enzyme, another conversion process occurs – androstenedione is converted to estrone. The task of inhibitory agents is to prevent this type of transformation, and they do this, as the name implies, by blocking aromatase.

 

How should aromatase inhibitors be taken when it comes to sports practice, what dosages and with what frequency to use?

 

Now let’s highlight some general rules for their use in sports.

So, aromatase blockers are used by most domestic athletes when the first signs of aromatization appear on the course, in relation to gynecomastia, these are swelling, redness and itching in the nipples. In such cases, the intake is usually carried out on a daily basis (this applies in particular to anastrozole).

An alternative option is their prophylactic use. In more detail, the use of aromatase inhibitors for men can also be carried out in small prophylactic doses from the very beginning of the course to prevent the formation and development of unwanted side effects caused by aromatizing steroids.

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